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3 Best Firewire Audio Interfaces: In This Case, More Is Better (2018)

Firewire Audio Interfaces: Firewire is not as usually used as other kinds of audio interface connections, so it just sounds like a name. Nonetheless, Firewire connectivity reverses the hesitation with super-fast bandwidth, faster than USB interfaces. This means it sends data at a faster rate, reducing the latency and providing better performance, reliability, and stability in your audio. Hence if you want to record a set of tracks simultaneously without dropping audio quality.  In case you want Best Firewire audio interface should be a part of your recording studio setup let us review Top Three of them.

Product Title Brand Color
PreSonusFireStudio FireWire Recording Interface PreSonus FireStudio Mobile 10x6 24-Bit 96 kHz Portable FireWire Recording Interface PreSonus N/A
FocusriteSaffire Pro 40 FirewireAudio Interface Focusrite Saffire Pro 40 Professional 20 In/20 Out Firewire Audio Interface with Eight Pre-Amps Focusrite Black
MOTUAudio Express MOTU Audio Express MOTU N/A

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3 Firewire Audio Interfaces: In This Case, More Is Better (2018)

#1 PreSonus FireStudio Mobile

Firewire Audio Interface

Features

This Firewire audio interface powered on its own but it functions just as well when pulling power from a computer. Further, it needs that power, seeing that it has two XLR/quarter-inch inputs and six line inputs. This allows you to record things like a full band, a full drum set, or just an acoustic guitar in stereo.

Gadget offers phantom power but only for the two XLR/quarter-inch inputs, not the six line inputs on the back of the interface. The two inputs on the front are supported by preamps. However, the other six are not supported. A feature that creates this audio interface unique from other interfaces in a way that it has two Firewire ports.

This means you can connect multiple interfaces to have more inputs and outputs for recording. If you want to use an input that admits either MIDI and S/PDIF, you’re in luck. The FireStudio Mobile has one input that functions with both, and it comes with an S/PDIF cable.

Design

The FireStudio Mobile’s design is plain and simple, precisely what you want for mobile recording. As you are ready for your recording equipment for recording wherever, you can keep this interface safe in your bag along with everything else. This is a small device, it is less than six inches wide and deep and less than 2 inches tall.

This little recording companion is prepared with shockproof, protected with metal chassis. Hence you can trust it will make it from point A to point B in one portion. The circuit board is military grade and the rotary controls are wrapped, to mean the electronic guts will stay safe and healthy. It functions with any DAW, but it comes with PreSonus own Studio One 3 Artist DAW, which claims it is easy to study. Further, it enables you to compose, record, and produce your masterpiece without getting diverted by the tools.

Performance

Obviously, for those recording audio remotely or in small spaces, this interface has its bounds. However, it performs just fine. The preamps are good, especially for an interface of this size, and you can get very good audio quality. However, the size can make it problematic to get things done. The knobs are small and when cables are persevered in, it can be tough to correct the gains.

Pros:

  • Small and tough, impeccable for mobile recording.
  • Several inputs for multi-track recording.

Cons:

  • Only two phantom powered inputs (XLR).

#2 Focusrite Saffire Pro 40

Firewire Audio Interface

Features

The highlight of this Firewire Audio interface is the number of inputs and outputs. With eight XLR/quarter-inch inputs and eight preamps to match. You have so much freedom to record different things. You could mic every piece of a full drum kit, you could record a huge choir.You can record a song live with your band. Additionally, it comes with two headphone jacks. This will make things very easy for recording with another musician.

The backside of the interface has in and outs for MIDI, SPDIF, and optical. It is also compatible with both Firewire and Thunderbolt. But it is not compatible with USB but Firewire and Thunderbolt work perfectly fine. Having a software package with a Firewire Audio interface is always great. Saffire MixControl is modest and does not offer as many choices as some other DAWs. Compared to other interfaces at this price point, you get pretty good bang for your buck.

Design

The Saffire Pro40’s extended body lets it have full controls on the front. It includes a gain knob for each of the eight inputs, a monitor volume knob, and a volume control for both of the headphone jacks. Furthermore, the levels of the separate channels are noticeably categorized. Additionally, it uses LED lights, which helps you to avoid peaking and setting the volume just right.

Additionally, it comes with a pack of software, including the Midnight Plug-in Suite. This gives you improved compression, reverb, gating, and EQ. Some users are disappointed about two of the inputs being on the front and the other six being on the back. Hence that is a practical consideration you will want to keep in mind. Overall the SaffirePro 40 appears to have everything which you want for a professional-sounding home recording.

Performance

It looks pretty nice and it does some well-ordered things. Eventually, when it works, users love it especially the quality of the preamps. But some engineers have criticized the sound delivered by the preamps is flat and not exceptional. And sometimes too silent when recording acoustic instruments.

Above all, you will get a very nice deal with the Saffire Pro40. It has attractive features you need to record from home at a very reasonable price and will let you get professional-level audio quality. The clean sound of the preamps is really the high-point of this device, making it worth a try.

Pros:

  • Eight XLR/quarter-inch inputs.
  • High-quality preamps.
  • Affordable price point.

Cons:

  • Not all the inputs are on the same side of the interface.

#3 MOTU Audio Express

Firewire Audio Interface

Features

This Firewire Audio interface functions better as a mixer, especially for live shows, in-studio, or as a monitor mixer. The technical aspect is: The Audio Express mixes the signals from the inputs down to an output pair while still being able to control the individual input volumes. This is good to mix live music with a PA system you could set your overall mix. But then mix the vocals going to the stage monitors differently.

One feature that makes this device exceptional is the pedal input, which lets you connect pretty much any footswitch. This lets you hit in when recording and keep your hand free for performing.

Another nice option is the capability to expand if desired. Simply add another Audio Express through Firewire or USB. Further, it includes driver-level support, hence the signals going in and out of both devices stay in sync throughout recording and playback.

Design

The MOTU Audio Express is a peculiar-looking Firewire audio interface. Most interfaces have everything such as the inputs, input gain knobs, headphone jacks, etc. But MOTU decided to construct the Audio Express with the inputs on one side and the knobs and headphone jack on the other. Obviously, this can take some getting used to and may upset some users.

Enduring with this odd design, the lights that display you the gain levels and frequency may take a little more brain power to understand.

But once you are practiced out the signal panel and get used to the odd setup of the device, it can serve you well. Because the most significant thing is not how the Audio Express looks but what it can do. An all-black design makes it look like a large external hard drive.

Performance

A fundamental point is whether an interface is popular in this market is if it is easy to use. Trying to discover a sense of balance between simple design and offers depends on as many features as they are available.

Even though the Audio Express offers a decent number of features as compared to other interfaces in its class, the setup and design of the actual device are confusing and very inconvenient.

Pros:

  • Choice of mix live and in-studio.
  • Pedal input option.

Cons:

  • Confusing and inconvenient design.

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